recommended readings

Unraveling the Double Bind: Women of Color in STEM
The Harvard Education Review

Publisher Comments:

At a recent symposium intended to once again gather women of color studying and working in STEM, organizer Maria Ong (2010) summarized the state of research on this population:

We found many, many dissertations. When I asked my researcher to find out how many had been published, what they had published, the answer came back as zero. I asked somebody else to do the same research; the answer came back as zero. ThereÕs not a knowledge gap. ItÕs a serious gap in publishing, in being able to get the word out...

To read more from the symposium, visit here.

A Class Divided, Then and Now
by William Peters

Publisher Comments:

William Peters examines how a "discrimination" exercise in 1970 affected children participants then and in 1984.

To order a copy of the book or read more details, visit here.

The Dream keepers: Successful Teachers of African American Children
by Gloria Ladson-Billings

Publisher Comments:

Ladson-Billings writes with three voices: as an African American scholar, a teacher, and a parent and community activist. Among the issues the author addresses in a readable blend of storytelling and scholarship are separatist education and culturally relevant teaching in content, presentation, and presenter. Current successes and future prospects for improving the school experiences of African American students are also addressed. Here is a book filled with pride and questions that should stimulate anyone interested in improving education.

To order a copy of the book or read more details, visit here.

In the Name of Identity: Violence and the Need to Belong
by Gloria Ladson-Billings

Publisher Comments:

In the Name of Identity is as close to summer reading as philosophy gets. It is a personal, sometimes even intimate, account of identity-in-the-world, not a treatise on the thorny metaphysics of identity. A novelist by trade, Amin Maalouf is a fluid writer, and he is aided by Barbara Bray's award-winning translation. His aim is to illuminate the roots of violence and hatred, which he sees in tribalistic forms of identity. He argues that our convictions and notions of identity--whether cultural, religious, national, or ethnic--are socially habituated and frequently dangerous. We'd give them up, he argues, if we thought more closely about them.Though the book has been heralded as radical and surprising, Maalouf essentially espouses an Enlightenment sensibility, a faith in the brotherhood of man. He is a believer in progress, arguing that "the wind of globalisation, while it could lead us to disaster, could also lead us to success." In fact, he envisions a globalized world in which our local identities are subordinated to a broader "allegiance to the human community itself." Maalouf wants us to retain our distinctiveness, but he wants it subsumed under the nave of common understanding.

To order a copy of the book or read more details, visit here.

The Flat World and Education: How America's Commitment to Equity Will Determine Our Future
by Linda Darling-Hammond

Publisher Comments:

The Flat World and Education offers an eye-opening wake-up call concerning America's future and vividly illustrates what the United States needs to do to build a system of high-achieving and equitable schools that ensures every child the right to learn.

To order a copy of the book or read more details, visit here.

Riding the Waves of Culture: Understanding Diversity in Global Business
by Charles Hampden-Turner

Publisher Comments:

As U.S. organizations continue to explore overseas business opportunities, they will be challenged to adapt to the new market's local characteristics, legislation, fiscal regime, sociopolitical environment and cultural system. Riding the Waves of Culture shows international managers how to build the skills, sensitivity, and cultural awareness needed to establish and sustain management effectiveness across cultural borders. This revised edition is updated with new research and statistics. More than an encyclopedia of cultures and customs, this is an essential guide.

To order a copy of the book or read more details, visit here.

The Difference: How the Power of Diversity Creates Better Groups, Firms, Schools, and Societies
by Scott E. Page

Publisher Comments:

Scott Page has brought to our attention a practically important proposition: diversity of viewpoints is of the greatest importance in solving the problems that face us individually and collectively. Diversity among a group of problem solvers is more important than individual excellence. Page's exposition remarkably combines lightness and breadth of knowledge with rigor and evidence.

To order a copy of the book or read more details, visit here.

Disintegration: The Splintering of Black America
by Eugene Robinson

Publisher Comments:

Instead of one black America, today there are four.

"There was a time when there were agreed-upon "black leaders," when there was a clear "black agenda," when we could talk confidently about "the state of black America" but not anymore."

The African American population in the United States has always been seen as a single entity: a "Black America" with unified interests and needs. In his groundbreaking book, Disintegration, Pulitzer-Prize winning columnist Eugene Robinson argues that over decades of desegregation, affirmative action, and immigration, the concept of Black America has shattered. Instead of one black America, now there are four:

  • a Mainstream middle-class majority with a full ownership stake in American society;
  • a large, Abandoned minority with less hope of escaping poverty and dysfunction than at any time since ReconstructionÕs crushing end;
  • a small Transcendent elite with such enormous wealth, power, and influence that even white folks have to genuflect;
  • and two newly Emergent groups & individuals of mixed-race heritage and communities of recent black immigrants that make us wonder what "black" is even supposed to mean.

    Robinson shows that the four black Americas are increasingly distinct, separated by demography, geography, and psychology. They have different profiles, different mindsets, different hopes, fears, and dreams. WhatÕs more, these groups have become so distinct that they view each other with mistrust and apprehension. And yet all are reluctant to acknowledge division.

    Disintegration offers a new paradigm for understanding race in America, with implications both hopeful and dispiriting. It shines necessary light on debates about affirmative action, racial identity, and the ultimate question of whether the black community will endure.

    To order a copy of the book or read more details, visit here.

    Waiting for Superman
    Edited by Karl Weber

    Publisher's Comments

    The American public school system is in crisis, failing millions of students, producing as many drop-outs as graduates, and threatening our economic future. By 2020, the United States will have 123 million high-skill jobs to fill and fewer than 50 million Americans qualified to fill them.

    Educators, parents, political leaders, business people, and concerned citizens are determined to save our educational system. Waiting for "Superman" offers powerful insights from some of those at the leading edge of educational innovation

    To order a copy of the book or read more details, visit here.

    A Class Divided
    by PBS

    Publisher's Comments

    A Class Divided is an expanded version of Eye of the Storm. In this documentary, Jane Elliott meets with her class to talk about the classroom experiment about discrimination she performed 15 years earlier and the effects it had on their lives. In addition, Jane Elliott is seen giving this lesson to employees of the Iowa prison system. To learn more, visit here.